“20 Days In 2020” – an update

wierd wood

It’s eleven weeks since I got back from my “20 days” painting retreat in Wales. What’s happened since getting back makes me yearn for those simpler days of just thinking about painting, dog walks and managing the weather.

Of course it’s been lovely getting back in touch with family and friends even in the socially distanced way we can now, but life is much more complicated and restricted. Emotions fluctuate between fear, guilt, frustration and relief and as the weeks roll by any novelty (however immature it was to feel it) has gone and left a level of tedium in its wake.

The jokes about our situation have been replaced with vitriol about the mishandling of the crisis, but the support we give each other now is much deeper and sensitive. Everyone’s experience is unique to them and complicated, but from this crisis so far has come some new richer friendships and valued new connections. I suppose my “20 Days” helped me understand that it’s all about doing what you have to do to get through and embracing the different emotions. It’s okay to be not okay all of the time – this will pass.

I’ve had a really heart warming response to my  “20 Days in 2020” journal, which along side painting sales has so far raised just under £400 profit which will go to Parkinson’s UK to fund research into the disease and hopefully help find a cure. Thanks to all who have supported this project so far. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you want a copy of my journal and artwork can be viewed at https://paintingwithmrp.com/20-days-work-for-sale/

Thank you and stay safe xx

Draft Brochure

“20 Days In 2020” – 2 weeks to go!

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Well, it’s nearly here – my 20 day challenge to cut myself off from my normal world of social media, wifi, tv and contact with others.
On Sunday 1st March I’ll be making my way to rural Wales to start my three weeks of isolation and painting. My beautiful dog Pedro will be my only company.

I’ll be reflecting on the past 18 months since my diagnosis of younger onset Parkinson’s Disease, and trying to express my emotions and feelings through painting.  I’ll also be keeping an illustrative journal.

I’m taking more than 20 different size canvasses, loads of paper, paints, pencils and charcoal.
I’ll be filling the car full off food for both me and Pedro.  I’ll also be taking my yoga and running gear, and definitely my knitting and a variety of books for those long quiet evenings.

The questions I’m most frequently asked about the “20 Days in 2020” challenge are:

Q. What will you do for fresh food?
A. I’ll have some for quite a few days, and then I’ll move on to tins and long life supplies.

Q. Will you be contactable?
A. No, there is no wifi and my phone will be turned off.

Q. Will you be safe?
A. There are a couple of other caravans in the farmer’s field, and there’s a farm house near by.

Q. What will you paint?
A. Who knows, that’s the point of the “20 days” project.

Q. Will you have contact with anyone, and go out shopping etc?
A. NO, not if I can help it. I’ll be taking everything I need with me.

So that’s the plan for the first three weeks in March and I’m apprehensive but also really looking forward to it.
I’m especially looking forward to the quiet, the opportunity to think and explore creative ideas, and of course spending quality time with Pedro.

Thanks to Sue Williams and Mark Rubery for lending me their caravan, and Caroline and Steve Bate, and Simon Barnes for their support with this project.

Please come and visit the exhibition of “20 Days In 2020” at the Canalside Heritage Centre, 2nd – 30th May 2020.

Pedro copy
Pedro x

Dancing, Digging Deep and Donations: the 24 hour non-stop danceathon

 

On Saturday 26th October 2019 my Sister and I embarked on a 24 hour non-stop danceathon to raise awareness and money for Parkinson’s UK.
Here’s my abridged account of the crazy but life-affirming experience:

First of all it’s worth explaining that we danced for 25 hours, not 24 due to it being the weekend that the clocks go back (I didn’t realise this when I set the date).
We arrived to set up at 8am and battled through the torrential rain and deepening puddles surrounding the community centre.
James the DJ kicked things off at 10am with “Lets Groove Tonight” by Earth Wind and Fire. My lasting memory of the start was my dear friend Liz crashing through the door as the clock struck 10am in running and hi-viz cycling gear after completing our local Parkrun and peddling like mad to be there at the start.

All started well but by 11am I was getting a bit overwhelmed by everything. I hadn’t been well during the week and had little sleep. I suddenly went very cold, light headed and felt generally worn out. I developed a severe shake and genuinely wasn’t sure I could go on. The thought of having to quit so early on made my symptoms worse. It took a couple of lovely friends Yvonne and Perky Parky mate Chris to sit with me in the back room and get me calm (whilst my Sister Kathryn was dancing). Chris who understands the condition just held me and reassured me until I was warm and ready to tackle the next 23 hours. I don’t think I could have carried on without this love and understanding.

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Chris and me after hugs and words of support.

Anyway it worked and the next few hours flew by, and before I knew it Jeanie Barton (with Bob Hudson on keys) were setting up to do the jazz thing – this was wonderful. It was particularly poignant as Bob has also been recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s.
Then my brother in law Jon arrived with a surprise package of our 83-year-old Dad Pete. I was completely taken a back seeing Dad, but once I’d gathered my composure I introduced him to friends who chatted and danced with him.

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Amanda dancing with Dad

Dave, Jon and Oliver did an amazing job looking after the kitchen providing tea, coffee and sausage cobs to daytime guests.
We had a candy floss machine for the little ones, and Bea kindly painted our faces with glittery designs.

After Jeanie and Bob finished their two sets things went a little quieter and it felt like a shift change over. Other guests arriving including: the wonderfully supportive Beeston AC, dog walking friends, many from our Friday Club, the two Katie’s from Parkinson’s UK, Sheila North and family, and other Parkinson’s sufferers like Trevor, Steve and Joe (and partners).
At about 8pm more food was delivered by the Tony and Sandi (we’d had a delivery earlier in the afternoon), and Dad was safely in his taxi journeying home.
Beeston Breakers kicked off the late evening by putting on a great breakdancing demo, and tried to teach us some breaking moves (without much success). The evening party really kicked off, feeling like a damn good wedding disco with all generations thrown together in celebration.  Flashing disco shoes lit up the floor, Abba costumes were worn and there were some amazing cakes being eaten. Drink and food were flowing when Brother in law Dave surprised us all with a disturbingly good impersonation of Freddie Mercury’s “I Want To Break Free”.

Sue and her friends joined their party with ours via FaceTime, and we danced and danced and danced.
Gradually as the night got late, people started to leave and the party thinned out. This would have been much harder to take if it hadn’t been for me knowing that Kathryn would be there throughout, and Caroline and Janice had committed to sticking with us till the end. This support is something I will never forget and has forged a special bond between us.

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Caroline, Kathryn, me and Janice

 

 

 

While the boys had cat naps, Wendy, Freda, Peggy with Greg and Teresa danced on with us to Northern Soul and then 90’s Indie till 4am! Naomi gave us her support between naps, and Greg was guessing whether the music was Shed Seven, Seahorses or one other of Caroline and my favourite 90’s bands from our “Irish” days. At 4pm Freda and Peggy left – this was an incredible effort by two of our Friday Club members, one who is about to turn 70, the other a few years older.


The next couple of hours were the hardest as it was just the four of us trying to keep going, celebrating the passing of every half hour, drinking water and keeping warm.

In expectation for the sun to come up and new people joining us soon our dancing moods lifted. Thank you Chris and Laura for bursting through the doors and bringing us new energy and the belief that we could make it – you’ll never know how much we needed to see you.
Others started to arrive, James the DJ sprung back into life, the sun beamed through the windows and we gradually got to the two hour countdown.

The room began to fill and the last song was Elton John’s “I’m still standing” and we danced like we’d only just started. It was so much fun and very emotional dancing with friends and family around.

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I’ve learn’t a lot this weekend, not least about my strengths and vulnerabilities. I really didn’t know if we could do it or not – it’s not something you can train for or read up on, but that’s the point to do something that challenges you.  I’d also be lying if I didn’t admit there were a few times in the 25 hours when I thought “How did we get here?” and “why me”? particularly in the wee hours, but the positive power of friends and family brought me round.  I’ve learn’t a lot about other people – one of the wonderful things about opening up and sharing is that other people then do it back to you – it’s healthy, heart warming and has brought me so much closer to some people I’ve known for years without perhaps knowing them much at all until now.  That has a huge value – thank you danceathon!

A massive thanks has got to go to my partners in crime James and Kathryn – we made an awesome team before and during the event.
I also must give massive thanks to my long suffering husband Simon (and Clacko who supported throughout) and my wider supporting family and friends for making this happen – all those that baked, donated, encouraged, ‘shared’ and danced! If I haven’t mentioned you, it’s not because I don’t appreciate you’re effort making this event what it was.

We’ve raised over £1,440 over the 25 hours – over £2,700 in total and still going up.
That’s more than £64 per hour and over £1.00 per minute that will go direct to researching a cure for Parkinsons, something we desperately need.  We’ve also talked a lot about Parkinsons, connected people, and hopefully made people more aware of the condition in a positive way.
You are all awesome! xx

You can still give at: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/janetandkathryndanceathon