Punching Through Parkinson’s: The Write UP

A little write up of the challenge. There’s so much more I could write, but I’d never finish. 

The idea

It started with the Parkinson’s boxing group at Maxine and Christian’s old gym that Christian used to run. I really liked the people and way it made me feel, and i carried on joining the Zoom classes that started at the beginning of COVIID19 lockdown. It was only at this point that I met Maxine, and I really appreciated the way the two of them had fun and motivated us together on screen. These Zoom boxing sessions kept us going during those first months.

I was looking for another physical challenge to keep fit and to raise awareness of Parkinson’s Disease, and mentioned the idea of a 12-hour boxing event to Christian and Maxine, and they were immediately up for it. The next person to tell was Caroline and of course she said she’d do it with me – what a reliable and supportive friend!

The training

I started individual PT sessions with Maxine via Zoom and it’s hard now to believe I hardly knew her then. The classes intensified and others such as Liz, Karen and Caroline joined me on zoom.

Ultimately Caroline and I had to get some serious joint training in with Maxine, so we booked in a regular slot of sweat and exhaustion on Tuesday evenings. I was also doing strength and boxing training on Monday evenings, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday mornings, 

When I first started this journey I was a puny 8st 9lb wimp with no upper body strength. My identity was being consumed  by the fact I’d been diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2018 and my body confidence was pretty low.

As I continued training I started to develop muscles I’d never had before and a level of fitness more like how I felt when I was in my 20’s, not of someone coming up to my 50th birthday.

I was also getting to know Maxine, and once COVID19 restrictions allowed we’d meet for a PT session at the newly opened gym, which coincidently was the old church where I was christened and went to church parade as a Brownie. 

The period of time during the pandemic was tough, with depression, ill health, and some very unpleasant stuff happening to friends and family. My training helped me through some pretty dark moments. As well as working me really hard, Maxine and I could have a good laugh and sometimes a good moan too. I shared some of my worst fears about my condition and Maxine listened and cared – this is something I will never forget.

The idea for the day developed and good friend Chris came up with a brilliant idea that 10 minute sessions could be bought off by others to relieve us of some of the 12 hours of boxing and to raise money for PDUK.

Due to the pandemic we rearranged the event three times, and right up to the final days of training we had extra setbacks. Caroline’s coach who was based in Yorkshire pulled out with two weeks to go to the challenge, so the schedule we’d been working to for the day was a third light on people to take pads. COVID 19 had affected Maxine, Genie and others within the team. We were all managing niggles and reoccurring injuries, and then in the last week Christian broke his foot!

We got through these setbacks, low moods and feelings of self doubt thanks to so many well wishes from friends. Donations were rolling in, and once again Beeston AC running friends (who I now count as friends in their right regardless of running) were amazingly supportive. Karen unexpectedly dropped by to see me on the Thursday night and handed me a robe. It turned out to be a boxing robe with “Punching Through Parkinson’s” embroidered  on the back – this was absolutely superb!

Mark @ BBC Radio Nottingham and others had helped promote the event in the run up – this was really important and appreciated.

Caroline and I had had our spray tans, we’d sorted out our clothes for the day and we were as fit as we were going to be.

I remember feeling nervous and excited the night before. We were ready!

The big day:

The day arrived and it was forecast to be the hottest day of the year.

Simon had agreed to just drop us off and pick us up, however unsurprisingly once he’d seen the gym and what we’d managed to organise he wanted to stay. He came back later and had two goes in the ring.

Jane was the first guest to enter the ring. Steve then joined via Zoom from Thailand. 

Emotions ran high when Parky friends joined in person, Ray and Sophie, Trevor, Ann, Liz and Les, Jackie and Richard. 

Others such as Suzanne in Austria, Trevor’s family in the US, members of Friday Club, Julie form Scotland, and Naomi and her one week old daughter Florence joined by Zoom. There were some very funny moments running the Zoom training, not least when I was taking Trevor and Janice on my own, and only after I’d been running the class for 5mins did I realise the professional Christian was sat in the corner eating some food watching. 

The day progressed and other wonderful supporters (too many to mention) joined in. These included The Coopers, The William’s, Liz, Ali, The Walsh’s, Simon, Claire and Jess, My family, and all the wonderful members of the gym.

Worth a special mention were the fellow coaches and members of the gym who stepped up to support us. They took us on pads, encouraged us, helped out on zoom sessions, fed us, and made the day better than any of us could have imagined. They approached the task with enthusiasm and warmth and never made Caroline feel like the amateur, mature women that we are. I will never forget the Resurrection MMAA team, and how they got us through it supporting Christian and Maxine by making us laugh, work hard and feel great.

It was never in doubt that’s we’d be able to do the 12 hours, after all we’d trained very hard for it and we had the superb team, and supporters with us. 

We boxed till the end and had a great final with all four of us in the ring till the 12hours was up. We all hugged and went into a group hug. I know I felt such love for the other three core team members, for what we had done, and how we had done it.

We drank some fizz, reflected on the day and then after about 45mins we went out into the darkness and drove home.

Reflections afterwards:

  • We used this phrase a lot during the day and it seems so apt: “She said she could so she did”.
  • The pride I feel for what the four of us achieved is immense – I wouldn’t have changed a single thing about the day.
  • There are a lot of very fine people in the world – I seem to know more than my fair share and for that I’m very grateful.
  • People are very generous and I can’t thank them enough – all money raised is going to research for better treatments and ultimately a cure for Parkinson’s.
  • Both Caroline and I want to keep on boxing.

“The Time Is Now”

I’ve always loved the song by Moloko and it sums up my current state of mind. During the last two weeks of self-isolation I scribbled down a few thoughts on what it can feel like when you get diagnosed with a degenerative disease.

It might give an insight as to why myself and others like me take on crazy challenges, and sometimes seem to be endlessly pushing ourselves.  Lets be clear, once you get a diagnosis like Parkinsons your whole world changes, everything you do, think about, plan is through a Parkinson’s filter or tint.  I think I’m quite a positive person but It seeps into everything I do and there isn’t a moment that goes by that I don’t think about it.  I’m training hard for a 12 hour boxing challenge “Punching Through Parkinson’s” and this challenge is important to me on many levels:

1. Keeping fit is very important to help delay the progression of Parkinson’s, so why wouldn’t you?

2. My body image is more important than it’s ever been. It’s the one thing I can control at the moment and it helps me fool myself (and others) that everything is going to be okay.

3. I’m obsessed by raising awareness (and money for research) of Parkinson’s so others diagnosed after me can feel more informed, accepted and understood within our society.

4. As other things start to be taken from me, my chosen challenges are within my control and provide me with renewed confidence and a sense of worth.

But all this has a time span.  As my condition worsens, my ability to do the above will reduce. So there’s a massive sense of urgency to life.  I have so much I want to do and achieve and my desire to do these things is greater that at any previous point in my life.  When you don’t know how long you’ve got left to be able to do things there suddenly becomes an urgency about life.  The challenges and opportunities in life seem easy compared to the looming threat of Parkinson’s and therefore “fear makes you fierce!  I no longer fear the pain or potential failure to complete a challenge, there are much scarier things to fear. Sometimes I break down in tears and sob with despair, the raw emotion and hope that some better medicines, and ultimately a cure will be found soon enough to help me and my lovely new found PD comrades before time runs out: THE TIME IS NOW.

Please support the “Punching Through Parkinson’s” challenge by reading and sharing the link below. Thank you, Janet xx

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/janet-barnes10